Win Tom Scott’s Money

By | March 23, 2020

Here’s something that we’ve been looking forward to for a while, Tom Scott Presents: Money, a game theory challenge I did a runthrough for.

Here’s the thing: to watch it right now you need access to Nebula, via CuriosityStream, which costs $2.99 a month. I know, it’s yet another video subscription service.

The good news: Tom Scott fans can get 31 days free.

It was super interesting to be a part of, so I look forward to seeing how it finally turned out.

11 thoughts on “Win Tom Scott’s Money

  1. David

    If you go through the Curiositystream website, it’s $11.99 for the first year until April 6th (then $19.99/yr thereafter)

    https://curiositystream.com/

    Trailer looks interesting, so I’ll probably just sign up (a ton of documentaries on there if you’re a fan of those)

    Reply
    1. David

      Scratch that- if you don’t go through his link, it doesn’t get you nebula (I had to cancel my first account through itunes and use another email to sign up)

      Reply
      1. Chris M. Dickson

        …and then when you’ve signed up, you have to realise that the show isn’t on Curiosity Stream, it’s on Nebula. So if you’ve signed up via Tom’s link you have Nebula access – but your Curiosity Stream username and password won’t work on Nebula by default, you have to apply to Nebula to set a Nebula password. I requested a Nebula “set password” link over an hour ago (twice) and the mail to do so still hasn’t arrived. It’s all a bit of a hassle, really.

        Reply
        1. David

          Did you get some sort of an email link after you signed up? I haven’t yet..

          Reply
          1. Brig Bother Post author

            I wasn’t going to watch this until tomorrow, so I thank you all for preparing me for hassle.

          2. Chris M. Dickson

            Still not, about three hours after signing up. Not great. Nebula’s twitter response to somebody else suggested e-mailing support@curiositystream.com so I have just tried that now.

            In the greater scheme of things, y’know, but still A Bad Start, which cannot be blamed upon Tom, but a bad start nevertheless, tripping over David Hasselhoff’s Hassle Hurdle. Someone claims to have seen it in a response to Tom’s twitter post, but conceivably they may have been a Nebula subscriber already.

        2. David B

          I just did the 7-day free trial on Nebula itself and got an immediate reply. So maybe try that initially, if you’re in a rush to watch it. You can sort of the Curiosity log-in at a later date.

          Reply
  2. David

    Ill give it a bit of a pass because of all the stuff going on- probably a lot of remote working and/or limited staff available…but agree, a hassle (I’ll give it a couple of hours before I try support)

    Reply
  3. Alex McMillan

    Watched it and really enjoyed it, felt adequately Genius-y enough to scratch that itch, but the immediacy and prevalence of “This is real actual money” made it feel a lot more rapid. Funnily enough, I could see it working as both a long-form series show and a daily repeatable format.

    A few of the players (I won’t say who) had some really nice gameplay and wouldn’t be out of place at all on some English run of The Genius Game.

    Reply
    1. Brig Bother Post author

      I liked it, although it didn’t really warm up until episode three for me (and I thought it was a pity it ended as fast as it did) – I spent the first two episodes thinking “blimey, we were more entertaining than this lot”. The Magic Money Machine is a complete bastard of a game though, I had played a variant of it as part of a research group ages ago, you really do feel hard done by when you’ve committed and others do not. I also liked Mike’s “this is what I’m doing, like it or block it and take nothing” approach which I took for a few of the games in testing (especially early doors).

      We didn’t play the negotiation game in our playtest, we got a box which got more money added to it as it passed between players until someone shut it and took the money for themselves (subsequent rounds had medals in the box also, but also minus money) or it hit a limit then it would get split equally.

      Apparently one of the playtest teams were all nicey-nicey and split all the money equally which made for lousy television, apparently there was a plan in place if this happened at the real filming, to sort of turn the doc on its head, in the end quite an odd mix of some good gameplay mixed with nicey-nicey elements towards the end, which turned out to be quite interesting if not especially dramatic.

      Reply

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